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Mia
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PostSubject: ~Get Help Here~   Fri Sep 18, 2009 10:31 am

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Get Help
Hotline Services

The National Domestic Violence Hotline answers more than 21,000 calls per month from victims, survivors, friends and family members, law enforcement personnel, domestic violence advocates and the general public. Hotline advocates provide support and assistance to anyone involved in a domestic violence situation, including those in same-sex relationships, male survivors, those with disabilities and immigrant victims of domestic violence. All calls to the National Domestic Violence Hotline are anonymous and confidential.

Hotline Services Include:

Crisis intervention, safety planning, information about domestic violence and referrals to local service providers
A direct connection to domestic violence resources available in the caller’s area provided by a Hotline advocate
Assistance in both English and Spanish with Hotline advocates having access to more than 170 different languages through interpreter services
Assistance through e-mail or [Only admins are allowed to see this link]
Informational materials on such topics as domestic violence, sexual assault, battering intervention and prevention programs, working through the criminal justice system and related issues.



Help is available to callers 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Hotline advocates are available for victims and anyone calling on their behalf to provide crisis intervention, safety planning, information and referrals to agencies in all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Assistance is available in English and Spanish with access to more than 170 languages through interpreter services. If you or someone you know is frightened about something in your relationship, please call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) or TTY 1-800-787-3224.


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PostSubject: Re: ~Get Help Here~   Fri Sep 18, 2009 10:32 am

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Computer use can be monitored and is impossible to completely clear.
If you are afraid your internet and/or computer usage might be monitored,
please use a safer computer, call your local hotline, and/or call the National
Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) or TTY 1-800-78
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PostSubject: Re: ~Get Help Here~   Fri Sep 18, 2009 10:32 am

Press Room
Each time a domestic violence story is covered, media has an opportunity to save lives.

The National Domestic Violence Hotline is a leading resource utilized by media, to provide viewers, listeners and readers with a toll-free number to call from anywhere in the country to access safety from their abusive relationships.

More than just a bridge to safety, the National Domestic Violence Hotline is available to callers 24 hours a day, 365 days a year to provide services in more than 170 languages. Hotline advocates answer questions, provide safety planning and information as well as directly connect callers to domestic violence resources available in their local calling area. All calls to the Hotline are confidential and anonymous.

Media Contacts
Retha Fielding
512.794.1133
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PostSubject: Re: ~Get Help Here~   Fri Sep 18, 2009 10:32 am

Domestic Violence Facts

Within the United States, one out of every four American women will experience violence by an intimate partner sometime during her lifetime. One out of every six women will be raped during her lifetime.

"A Crime Against Women" | Vulnerability Factors | Physical Injury | Murder | Under-reporting to Police | Police Response Frequently Inadequate | The Myth of "Mutuality" | Police Training Resources

Domestic violence is both a national and a worldwide crisis. According to a 2000 UNICEF study, 20-50% of the female population of the world will become the victims of domestic violence.

"A Crime Against Women"
Although men are more likely to be victims of violent crime overall, a recent study by the U.S. Department of Justice reports that "intimate partner violence is primarily a crime against women."


Of those victimized by an intimate partner, 85% are women and 15% are men. In other words, women are 5 to 8 times more likely than men to be victimized by an intimate partner.


The vast majority of domestic assaults are committed by men. Even when men are victimized, 10% are assaulted by another man. In contrast, only 2% of women who are victimized are assaulted by another woman.

Vulnerability Factors
Women age 16 to 24 are most likely to be victimized by an intimate partner.


African-American women experience more domestic violence than White women in the age group of 20-24. However, Black and White women experience the same level of victimization in all other age categories.


Hispanic women are less likely to be victimized than non-Hispanic women in every age group.


Women are most vulnerable to violence when separated from their intimate partner. The second most vulnerable group are those who are divorced.2 This can discourage women from leaving their abusive partner, out of fear that it will increase their risk of victimization.

Physical Injury
Approximately 40-50% of female victims are physically injured when assaulted by their intimate partner, accounting for over 200,000 visits to the hospital emergency room each year.


Only about 1 in 5 of domestic violence victims with physical injuries seek professional medical treatment.

Murder
Women are far more likely than men to be murdered by an intimate partner. Of those murdered by their intimate partner, 74% are women and 26% are men. In other words, nearly 3 out of 4 of the murders committed by intimate partners have a female victim.


The FBI reports that between 1976 and 1996, domestic violence claims the lives of more than four women each day.


Between 1976 and 1996, there was a "sharp decrease" in the number of men murdered by intimate partners, whereas the number of women murdered by an intimate partner remained constant.3 Some have attributed this to the increasing availability of shelters which provide battered women with options other than killing an abusive partner. It is possible that some women who might have otherwise killed their abuser are able to leave and go to a shelter.

Under-reporting of Domestic Violence to Police
Only about half of domestic violence incidents are reported to police. African-American women are more likely than others to report their victimization to police.


The most common reasons for not reporting domestic violence to police are that victims view the incident as a personal or private matter, they fear retaliation from their abuser, and they do not believe that police will do anything about the incident.


Even with this dramatic under-reporting, domestic violence calls constitute approximately half of all violent crime calls to police departments. For example, 49% of the violent crime calls received by the DC Metropolitan Police Department in 2000 were for domestic violence incidents.

Police Response Frequently Inadequate
Skepticism regarding the quality of police response is grounded in reality. A recent study by the D.C. Metropolitan Police Department concluded that there was a "clear and pervasive pattern" of departures from departmental policy.


For example, in only one-third of the domestic violence calls did an officer take photographs or ask about prior abuse.


Only 17% of the victims were asked about a restraining order, and 83% were provided no printed information with contact information or resources.

For information on domestic violence in policing families, please see the National Center for Women and Policing's Fact Sheet on Police Family Violence.

The Myth of "Mutuality"
Although many studies report that men and women use physical violence at equal rates within intimate relationships, this fails to take into account the nature of the violence and the level of fear and injury experienced by each party.


Several studies document that women experience higher levels of fear than men do in domestic violence situations.This is perhaps because women in domestic violence situations are much more likely to be injured -- and injured severely -- than men are.

Recent years have seen an increase in the number of women arrested for domestic violence. For example, the percentage of women arrested for domestic violence increased in Concord, New Hampshire from 23% in 1993 to 35% in 1999. Vermont saw a similar increase from 16% in 1997 to 23% in 1999.

Some have attributed this to the increase in "mandatory arrest" policies, in which police are required to make an arrest if there is probable cause that a person has committed domestic violence. Passage of these laws was advocated by feminists and domestic violence experts to address the inadequate response to domestic violence victims by law enforcement. When officers arrive at the scene of a domestic violence crime, they often cite evidence that both partners have engaged in some aggressive behavior, and arrest both the man and the woman. This "dual arrest" strategy fails to take into account which of two people is primarily responsible for the aggression and which one is responding out of self-defense, and can have devastating effects, particularly if there are children involved in the relationship.

To counteract this problem, some departmental or statewide policies now provide guidelines for an officer to determine who is the "primary aggressor" in a violent incident. For example, the California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training publishes a guidebook for officers responding to domestic violence, discouraging "dual arrests" and outlining several factors to consider when determining who is the primary aggressor in a domestic violence situation. The primary aggressor is defined as "the person determined to be the most significant, rather than the first, aggressor." Factors to consider include the history of domestic violence between the people involved, the threats and fear level of each person, and whether either person acted in self defense. These are appropriate considerations when determining who is the primary aggressor, and therefore which of the two parties should be arrested.

Police Training Resources
For more information or to identify expert law enforcement trainers in the area of domestic violence, please contact the National Center for Women & Policing. We at the National Center have compiled a list of law enforcement trainers that we recommend, based on a review of training materials gathered from around the country. This review was conducted with funding provided by a grant from the Violence Against Women Office of the U.S. Department of Justice. Email us at [Only admins are allowed to see this link] or call at (323) 651-2532.
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PostSubject: Re: ~Get Help Here~   Fri Sep 18, 2009 10:33 am

New Mexico State Coalition Against Domestic Violence
200 Oak St NE #4
Albuquerque, NM 87106
TOLL-FREE: 800-773-3645 (in New Mexico Only)
Legal Helpline: 800-209-DVLH
Phone: 505-246-9240
FAX: 505-246-9434
E-mail: [Only admins are allowed to see this link]

New York State Coalition Against Domestic Violence
350 New Scotland Avenue
Albany New York 12208
Phone: 518-482-5465
English: 1-800-942-6906
English TTY: 1-800-818-0656
Spanish: 1-800-942-6908
Spanish TTY: 1-800-780-7660
Email us at [Only admins are allowed to see this link]

North Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence
123 W. Main Street, Suite 700
Durham , NC 27701
Phone: 919-956-9124
FAX: 919-682-1449
Toll Free: 1-888-232-9124

North Dakota Council on Abused Women's Services
State Networking Office
418 East Rosser Avenue, Suite 320
Bismarck, ND 58501
TOLL-FREE: 800-472-2911 (In ND Only)
Phone: 701-255-6240
FAX: 701-255-1904

Ohio Domestic Violence Network
4807 Evanswood Drive
Suite 201
Columbus , Ohio 43229
(614) 781-9651
(614) 781-9652 Fax
(614) 781-9654 TTY
E-mail: [Only admins are allowed to see this link]

Oklahoma Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault
3815 N. Santa Fe Avenue, Suite 124
Oklahoma City , OK 73118
405-524-0700 telephone
405-524-0711 fax

Oregon Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault
380 Spokane St .
Suite 100
Portland , OR 97202
Telephone: 503-230-1951
Fax: 503-230-1973
Statewide Crisis Number : 1-888-235-5333

Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence/National Resource Center on Domestic Violence
6440 Flank Drive, Suite 1300
Harrisburg, PA 17112-2778
TOLL-FREE: 800-932-4632
Phone: 717-545-6400
FAX: 717-545-9456

Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence/National Resource Center on Domestic Violence
125 N. Enola Drive
Enola PA 17025
HOTLINE: 800-692-7445
Phone: 717-728-9740
Fax: 717-671-8149
TTY: 877-585-1091


Women's Center of Montgomery County
Main Administrative Office:
101 Washington Lane, Ste. WC-1
Jenkintown PA 19046
Toll-free hotline: 800-773-2424
Norristown Office:
Women's Advocacy Project
400 Courthouse Plaza, 18 W. Airy St.
Norristown PA 19404
610-279-1548
Pottstown Office:
Women's Advocacy Project
555 High Street, 2nd Floor
Pottstown PA 19464
610-970-7363
Bryn Mawr Office:
610-525-1427
Lansdale Office:
215-853-8060



Laurel House
P.O. Box 764
Norristown, PA 19404
Phone: 610-277-1860
HOTLINE: 1-800-642-3150
Fax: 610-275-4018
E-Mail: [Only admins are allowed to see this link]

Rhode Island Coalition Against Domestic Violence
422 Post Road, Suite 202
Warwick, RI 02888
TOLL-FREE: 800-494-8100
Phone: 401-467-9940
FAX: 401-467-9943
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South Carolina Coalition Against Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault
(Link only works in Microsoft Internet Explorer)
P.O. Box 7776
Columbia, SC 29202-7776
TOLL-FREE: 800-260-9293
Phone: 803-256-2900
FAX: 803-256-1030

South Dakota Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault
P.O. Box 141
Pierre, SD 57501
TOLL-FREE: 800-572-9196
Phone: 605-945-0869
FAX: 605-945-0870

PO Box 1402
Sioux Falls, SD 57101
(605) 271-3171 Phone
(605) 271-3172 Fax
1-877-317-3096
(Info/Referral only)
Email: [Only admins are allowed to see this link]

South Dakota Network Against Family Violence and Sexual Assault
1-800-430-SAFE

Resource Center of Aberdeen, SD
24-Hour Crisis Line: (605) 226-1212
Toll Free: (888) 290-2935

Tennessee Task Force Against Domestic Violence
P.O. Box 120972
Nashville, TN 37212
TOLL-FREE: 800-289-9018
Phone: 615-386-9406
FAX: 615-383-2967

Texas Council on Family Violence
P.O. Box 161810
Austin, TX 78716
TOLL-FREE: 800-525-1978
Phone: 512-794-1133
FAX: 512-794-1199

Families In Crisis, Inc.
P.O. Box 25
Killeen, Texas 76540
Phone: 254-773-7765
Fax: 254-526-6111
1-888-799-SAFE

Domestic Violence Advisory Council
120 North 200 West
Salt Lake City, UT 84103
TOLL-FREE: 800-897-LINK
Phone: 801-538-4100
FAX: 801-538-3993

Women Helping Battered Women
PO BOX 1535
Burlington, VT
Phone: 802-658-1996
Toll-free: 1-800-228-7395

Women's Rape Crisis Center
1-800-489-7273

Vermont Network Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault
P.O. Box 405
Montpelier, VT 05601
Phone: 802-223-1302
FAX: 802-223-6943
E-mail: [Only admins are allowed to see this link]

Virginians Family Violence and Sexual Assault Hotline
2850 Sandy Bay Road, Suite 101
Williamsburg, VA 23185
TOLL-FREE: 800-838-VADV
Phone: 757-221-0990
FAX: 757-229-1553

Charlottesville , VA
508 Dale Ave
Charlottesville , VA 22903-4547
Phone: 434-979-9002
Fax: 434-979-9003

Richmond , VA
1010 N. Thompson St.
Suite 202
Richmond , VA 23230
Phone: 804-377-0335
Fax: 804-377-0339

Toano , VA
102 Industrial Blvd.
Toano , VA 23168
Phone: 757-566-4602
Fax: 757-566-4670


Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence


WSCADV- Olympia Office
101 N. Capitol Way, Suite 103
Olympia, WA 98501
Phone: 360-586-1022
Fax: 360-586-1024
TTY: 360-586-1029

WSCADV - Seattle Office
1402 - 3rd Ave, Suite 406
Seattle WA 98101
(206) 389-2515
(206) 389-2520 FAX
(206) 389-2900 TTY
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Washington State Domestic Violence Hotline
Tel: 800-562-6025
E-mail: [Only admins are allowed to see this link]

West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence
Elk Office Center
4710 Chimney Drive, Suite A
Charleston, WV 25302
Phone: 304-965-3552
FAX: 304-965-3572

Manitowoc Domestic Violence Center
PO Box 1142
Manitowoc, WI 54220
Phone: 920-684-5770

Wisconsin Domestic Violence Center
307 S. Paterson St. #1
Madison , WI 53703
Phone: 608-255-0539
FAX: 608-255-3560

Wyoming Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault
409 South 4th Street
P.O. Box 236
Laramie, WY 82073
TOLL-FREE: 800-990-3877
Phone: 307-755-5481
FAX: 307-755-5482

YWCA Battered Women Task Force
225 SW 12th St.
Topeka, KS 66612
Daytime: 785-354-7927
Evening and Weekend: 785-234-3300
Outside Topeka: 1-888-822-2983


National Organizations
Family Violence Prevention Fund
383 Rhode Island Street, Suite 304
San Francisco, CA 94103-5133
Phone: 415-252-8900
FAX: 415-252-8991

Washington, DC Office
1522 K Street, NW #550
Washington DC 20005

Boston Office
67 Newbury Street, Mezzanine Level
Boston, MA 02116


National Coalition Against Domestic Violence
Public Policy Office
1633 Q Street NW, Suite 210
Washington, DC 20009
Phone: 202-745-1211
Fax: 202-745-0088
TTY - (202) 745-2042

National Coalition Against Domestic Violence
1120 Lincoln Street, Suite 1603
Denver, CO 80203
Phone: 303-839-1852
Fax: 303-831-9251
TTY - (303) 839-1681

National Battered Women's Law Project
275 7th Avenue, Suite 1206
New York, NY 10001
Phone: 212-741-9480
FAX: 212-741-6438

Victim Services
Domestic Violence Shelter Tour
2 Lafayette Street 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10007
Phone: 212-577-7700
Fax: 212-385-0331
24-hour hotline: 800-621-HOPE (4673)

National Resource Center on DV
Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence
6400 Flank Drive, Suite 1300
Harrisburg, PA 17112
Phone: 800-537-2238
FAX: 717-545-9456

Health Resource Center on Domestic Violence
Family Violence Prevention Fund
383 Rhode Island Street, Suite 304
San Francisco, CA 94103-5133
Phone: 800-313-1310
FAX: 415-252-8991

Battered Women's Justice Project
Minnesota Program Development, Inc
202 East Superior Street
Duluth , MN 55802
(218) 722-2781

Resource Center on Domestic Violence, Child Protection, and Custody
NCJFCJ
P.O. Box 8970
Reno, NV 89507
Office: 775-784-6012
Phone: 800-527-3223
FAX: 775-784-6628
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They are only a resource center for professionals and agencies.

Battered Women's Justice Project
c/o National Clearinghouse for the Defense of Battered Women
125 South 9th Street, Suite 302
Philadelphia, PA 19107
TOLL-FREE: 800-903-0111 ext. 3
Phone: 215-351-0010
FAX: 215-351-0779
National Clearinghouse is a national resource and advocacy center providing assistance to women defendants, their defense attorneys, and other members of their defense teams in an effort to insure justice for battered women charged with crimes.

National Clearinghouse on Marital and Date Rape
2325 Oak Street
Berkeley, CA 94708
Phone: 510-524-1582

Faith Trust Institute
(Formerly Center for the Prevention of Sexual and Domestic Violence)
2400 N. 45th Street #10
Seattle , WA 98103
206-634-1903 phone
206-634-0115 fax

National Network to End Domestic Violence
660 Pennsylvania Avenue SE, Suite 303
Washington, DC 20003
Phone: 202-543-5566
FAX: 202-543-5626
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PostSubject: Re: ~Get Help Here~   Fri Sep 18, 2009 10:33 am

Government Research & Reference

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PostSubject: Re: ~Get Help Here~   Fri Sep 18, 2009 11:23 am

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--------------------------------------------------------------
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If you, or someone you know, are a victim of domestic violence,
sexual assault, stalking, or dating violence please know that help is available.

If you, or someone you know, are a victim of domestic violence, please call:
National Domestic Violence Hotline
1-800-799-SAFE (7233)
1-800-787-3224 (TTY)

In addition, please visit our page on Domestic Violence Resources.

If you, or someone you know, are a victim of sexual assault, please call:
Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network (RAINN)
To be connected to the rape crisis center nearest to you, dial
1-800-656-HOPE (4673)

National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC)
1-877-739-3895

In addition, please visit our page on Sexual Assault Resources.

If you, or someone you know, are a victim of stalking, please call:
National Center for Victims of Crime, Stalking Resource Center
1-800-394-2255
1-800-211-7996 (TTY)

In addition, please visit our page on Stalking Resources.

If you, or someone you know, are a victim of dating violence,
please call:
National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline
1-866-331-9474
1-866-331-8453 TTY
You can also chat live on-line with a trained Peer Advocate from 4 p.m.
to 2 a.m. (CST) daily.
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PostSubject: Re: ~Get Help Here~   Fri Sep 18, 2009 11:24 am

About Domestic Violence



Domestic violence can be defined as a pattern of abusive behavior in any relationship that is used by one partner to gain or maintain power and control over another intimate partner.

Domestic violence can be physical, sexual, emotional, economic, or psychological actions or threats of actions that influence another person. This includes any behaviors that intimidate, manipulate, humiliate, isolate, frighten, terrorize, coerce, threaten, blame, hurt, injure, or wound someone.

Physical Abuse: Hitting, slapping, shoving, grabbing, pinching, biting, hair-pulling, biting, etc. Physical abuse also includes denying a partner medical care or forcing alcohol and/or drug use.


Sexual Abuse: Coercing or attempting to coerce any sexual contact or behavior without consent. Sexual abuse includes, but is certainly not limited to marital rape, attacks on sexual parts of the body, forcing sex after physical violence has occurred, or treating one in a sexually demeaning manner.


Emotional Abuse: Undermining an individual's sense of self-worth and/or self-esteem. This may include, but is not limited to constant criticism, diminishing one's abilities, name-calling, or damaging one's relationship with his or her children.


Economic Abuse: Making or attempting to make an individual financially dependent by maintaining total control over financial resources, withholding one's access to money, or forbidding one's attendance at school or employment.


Psychological Abuse: Causing fear by intimidation; threatening physical harm to self, partner, children, or partner's family or friends; destruction of pets and property; and forcing isolation from family, friends, or school and/or work.


Domestic violence can happen to anyone regardless of race, age, sexual orientation, religion, or gender. Domestic violence affects people of all socioeconomic backgrounds and education levels. Domestic violence occurs in both opposite-sex and same-sex relationships and can happen to intimate partners who are married, living together, or dating.

Domestic violence not only affects those who are abused, but also has a substantial effect on family members, friends, co-workers, other witnesses, and the community at large. Children, who grow up witnessing domestic violence, are among those seriously affected by this crime. Frequent exposure to violence in the home not only predisposes children to numerous social and physical problems, but also teaches them that violence is a normal way of life - therefore, increasing their risk of becoming society's next generation of victims and abusers.
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PostSubject: Re: ~Get Help Here~   Fri Sep 18, 2009 11:24 am

Stalking Victimization in the United States Special Report



Bureau of Justice -Statistics Releases Findings- in Largest Study of Stalking Conducted to date.
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The Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics recently released a supplemental report to the National Crime Victimization Survey focused on Stalking Victimization in the United States. This Supplemental Victimization Survey (SVS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) is the most comprehensive study of stalking to date and confirms that stalking is pervasive, women are at higher risk of being stalked, and there is a dangerous intersection between stalking and more violent crimes.
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The SVS was specifically developed, with funding from OVW, to provide national-level data on the crime of stalking. As a result of this study, OVW is even more committed to addressing the crime of stalking by providing safety to victims and holding perpetrators accountable.

The SVS identified seven types of harassing or unwanted behaviors consistent with stalking, and individuals were classified as stalking victims if they responded that they experienced two or more of these behaviors on two or more separate occasions. In addition, the individuals must have reported fear for their safety or that of a family member as a result of the course of conduct, or they must have experienced additional threatening behaviors that would cause a reasonable person to feel fear. The SVS measured the following:



*making unwanted phone calls;
*sending unsolicited or unwanted letters or e-mails;
*following or spying on the victim;
*showing up at a place where they had no reason to be;
*waiting at places for the victim;
*leaving unwanted items, presents, or flowers;
*posting information or spreading rumors about the victim on the internet, in a public place, or by word of mouth.


Some of the SVS: Stalking Victimization in the United States Report findings include:

During a 12 month period an estimated 3.4 million persons age 18 or older were victims of stalking.
Females experienced 20 stalking victimizations per 1,000 females age 18 or older.
The rate of stalking victimizations for males was approximately 7 per 1,000 males age 18 or older.
Persons age 18 to 19 and 20 to 24 experienced the highest rates of stalking victimization
One in 7 victims reported they moved as a result of the stalking.
Approximately 60% do not report victimization to the police.
Bureau of Justice Statistics: Stalking Victimization in the United States

About Stalking

Stalking can be defined as a pattern of repeated and unwanted attention, harassment, contact, or any other course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to feel fear.

It is a course of conduct that can include:

Repeated, unwanted, intrusive, and frightening communications from the perpetrator by phone, mail, and/or email
Repeatedly leaving or sending victim unwanted items, presents, or flowers
Following or laying in wait for the victim at places such as home, school, work, or recreation place
Making direct or indirect threats to harm the victim, the victim's children, relatives, friends, or pets.
Damaging or threatening to damage the victim's property
Harassing victim through the internet
Posting information or spreading rumors about the victim on the internet, in a public place, or by word of mouth
Obtaining personal information about the victim by accessing public records, using internet search services, hiring private investigators, going through the victim's garbage, following the victim, contacting victim's friends, family work, or neighbors, etc.
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PostSubject: Re: ~Get Help Here~   Fri Sep 18, 2009 11:24 am

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SAFEHOUSE
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PostSubject: Re: ~Get Help Here~   Fri Sep 18, 2009 11:25 am

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Anderson House - A halfway house for women recovering from alcohol and drug dependency.
Back Hills Guest House for Women, The - Victoria, B.C.
Claire House - Residential program for women and their children , utilizing individual, group and family counseling, as well as exercise, recreational activity, 12-step self-help groups and a structured, disciplined environment. The women and children will receive state-of-the-art care to restructure their lives and live successfully, drug free.
Dorcas House - Tampa Florida based ministry that gives shelter on a temporary basis to women and women with children who have no place to stay because of spousal abuse, women released from jail without a permanent place to stay, and women in transit who are victims of crime and temporarily without money for food and shelter.
Epiphany House - Long Branch, NJ
Hecate House - Newseeland
House of Hope - Santa Ana, CA
Laura's House - Abused women and their children need Laura's House. Committed to ending violence against women. We provide the abused woman and their children with a safe, violent-free shelter, counseling, advocacy, resources and a 24-hour hotline.
Mrs. Wilson's Halfway House for Women - A 14-bed, 12-step, halfway house for recovering women located in Morristown, New Jersey. It is named after the wife of AA's co-founder, Bill Wilson.
Quigley House - Offers safe emergency shelter and support services for women and their children in Clay County Florida and the surrounding areas. The only shelter for battered women and children in Clay County Florida.
Sophia Snow House - A retirement center for women, it is home to 24 elderly women who are enjoying the security, companionship, and convenience of a small-scale assisted living arrangement.

ABBA HOUSE-http://www.abbahouse.com/index.php?pageid=1
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PostSubject: Re: ~Get Help Here~   Fri Sep 18, 2009 11:26 am

CRISIS HOTLINE NUMBERS-http://www.athealth.com/Consumer/issues/hotlines.html

Toll-Free
Crisis Hotline Numbers

Crisis Type Who to Call Hotline Hours Who They Help
Child Abuse Childhelp USA
(Child Abuse Hotline)
800
4-A-CHILD
800
422-4453 24 hrs.
7 days
child abuse victims, offenders, parents

Family Violence National Domestic Violence Hotline 800
799-SAFE
800
799-7233 24 hrs.
7 days
children, parents, friends, offenders
Missing/
Abducted Children Child Quest International Sighting Line 888
818-4673 24 hrs.
7 days
individuals with missing child emergencies and/or sighting information
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children 800
843-5678 24 hrs.
7 days
parents, law enforcement
Child Find of America 800
I-AM-LOST
800
426-5678 9:00-5:00
EST, M-F;
24 hr answering machine parents reporting lost or abducted children
Child Find of America - Mediation 800
A-WAY-OUT
800
292-9688 9:00-5:00
EST, M-F;
24 hr answering machine parents (abduction, child custody)
Operation Lookout
National Center for Missing Youth 800
LOOKOUT
800
566-5688 9:00-6:00
PST, M-F individuals with missing child emergencies and/or sighting information
Rape/
Incest Rape Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN) 800
656-HOPE
800
656-4673 24 hrs, 7 days rape and incest victims
Relief for Caregivers National Respite Locator Service 800
677-1116
8:30-5:00 EST, M-F parents and professionals caring for children with disabilities, or terminal illness, or at risk of child abuse or neglect
Youth in Trouble
Runaways Covenant House Hotline 800
999-9999 24 hrs, 7 days problem teens and runaways family members
National Referral Network for Kids in Crisis 800
KID-SAVE
800
543-7283 24 hrs, 7 days professionals, parents, adolescents
National Runaway Switchboard (NRS) 800
621-4000 24 hrs, 7 days adolescents, families
Youth Crisis Hotline
(Youth Developmental Internation) 800
HIT-HOME
800
448-4663 24 hrs, 7 days individuals wishing to obtain help for runaways

Boys Town 800
448-3000 24 hrs, 7 days troubled children, parents, family members
Victims of Violent Crimes National Victim Center 800
FYI-CALL
800
394-2255 8:30-5:30 EST, M-F all victims of violent crimes

Source: National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information Updated by the Clearinghouse on April 23, 2001.


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State Toll-Free Child Abuse Reporting Numbers

Alaska (AK)
800-478-4444
Arizona (AZ)
888-SOS-CHILD
(888-767-2445)
Arkansas (AR)
800-482-5964
Connecticut (CT)
800-842-2288
800-624-5518 (TDD/hearing impaired)
Delaware (DE)
800-292-9582
Florida (FL)
800-96-ABUSE
(800-962-2873)
Illinois (IL)
800-252-2873
Indiana (IN)
800-562-2407
Iowa (IA)
800-362-2178
Kansas (KS)
800-922-5330
Kentucky (KY)
800-752-6200
Maine (ME)
800-452-1999
Maryland (MD)
800-332-6347
Massachusetts (MA)
800-792-5200
Michigan (MI)
800-942-4357
Mississippi (MS)
800-222-8000
Missouri (MO)
800-392-3738
Montana (MT)
800-332-6100
Nebraska (NE)
800-652-1999
Nevada (NV)
800-992-5757
New Hampshire (NH)
800-894-5533
New Jersey (NJ)
800-792-8610
800-835-5510 (TDD/hearing impaired)
New Mexico (NM)
800-432-2075
New York (NY)
800-342-3720
North Dakota (ND)
800-245-3736
Oklahoma (OK)
800-522-3511
Oregon (OR)
800-854-3508
Pennsylvania (PA)
800-932-0313
Rhode Island (RI)
800-RI-CHILD
(800-742-4453)
Texas (TX)
800-252-5400
Utah (UT)
800-678-9399
Virginia (VA)
800-552-7096
Washington (WA)
800-562-5624
West Virginia (WV)
800-352-6513
Wyoming (WY)
800-457-3659
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PostSubject: Re: ~Get Help Here~   Fri Sep 18, 2009 11:27 am

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PostSubject: Re: ~Get Help Here~   Fri Sep 18, 2009 11:27 am

The Storm-




The storm is big and deadly as it sweeps across my room,

I'm shielded by my brother who's getting beaten with a broom.

He makes no sounds, he's so strong as he takes every hit,

If he'd just stayed in his room, he wouldn't have been touched one bit.

He runs to my protection, making sure that I am safe,

I wish the storm would go away, it's the only thing I hate.


A long time later, the storm is gone, screeching away in the car,

Headed off some other place, probably the nearest bar.

My brother's lying in his room, curled up on his bed,

I look at him and start to cry, bruises, scratches, open wounds,

Covering his head.

His eyes open as he hears my steps and for some reason he smiles,

He wipes away my tears and says "Don't cry pretty Cinda, hop up on the bed with me, lets sleep for a while."

Time goes by I start to drift, completely safe I feel,
Against my back, his beating heart, his arms create my shield.


Hours now, it's full black, we awake to a bang outside,

The storm is back, my brother yells "Quickly Cinda, Hide!"

Outside the door we hear the storm come loudly up the stairs,

I look up to see my brothers eyes, for my safety he is scared.

He lifts me up in his arms as he drops down to his knees,

So softly he places me under his bed, praying that the storm won't see.

Just in time he's on his feet as the storm blows open the door,

What happened to my brothers feet? I don't see them anymore..

Seconds later I hear a bang on the other side of the room,

His body smashes to the ground, but I don't see him move.


Tears are pouring down my face as I let out a little squeek,

The storm is mad and pulls me out but I can't fight it, I'm too little, too weak.

I feel it's grip on both my wrists as it's pulling them apart,

My back is hurting and I am screaming, I'm trying to kick but I can't.

My brother's crawling across the floor, he's now too weak to stand,

His arm is broken, can't move both legs, he's pulling with just one hand.

His face is covered, his shirt is soaked, in a red so dark, so deep,

I'm squinting my eyes and I'm screaming out loud, wishing we could just go back to sleep.


I wish it was over, I can't take this pain as I'm thrown down to the floor,

My brother scrambles to his feet, crouches over my body, trying to protect once more.

I feel his trembling body on me as it tries its best to protect,

His eyes can't focus, he can't move, he can barely lift his head.

I feel the storm yank him up, and by his leg, pull him down the stairs,

He didn't do anything, he doesn't deserve this, his life is so unfair.


As he's getting dragged down the hallway, I'm still crying on the floor,

His eyes find mine, he starts to smile, he knows he's kept me safe once more.

His eyelids close, his eyebrows flatten, he's somehow found his peace,

His lips move to say "I love you" but I don't hear him speak.

He's being pulled into another room, where the storm will soon unleash,

He tries to calm me and attempts to grin, I see his blood stained teeth.

The door slams shut, can't see him anymore, I try get to my feet,

I can't stand up, I fall back down and cringe as i hear him scream.

I heard every thing that went on in that room that night;

After the storm had gone away and driven off again,

What I saw as I opened that door, gave me the biggest fright.

His arms are twisted, his body mangled, lying in a pool of blood,

His eye's looking back at me, I couldn't breathe as I saw him there, I said "God, what have I done!"


The storm hit my big brother for the second time today,

I see the pain of every scratch spread across his face.

He smiles at me and tries to talk but he has no breath left to give,

I'm looking at him lying there, this is no way to live.

In the body of a ten year old boy, he's forced to be a man,

He's starting to fall asleep now, still smiling, as I'm right there holding his hand.
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PostSubject: Re: ~Get Help Here~   Fri Sep 18, 2009 11:28 am

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PostSubject: Re: ~Get Help Here~   Fri Sep 18, 2009 11:28 am

Am I being Abused?

How is your relationship?

Does your partner:
•Embarrass you with put-downs?
•Look at you or act in ways that scare you?
•Control what you do, who you see or talk to or where you go?
•Stop you from seeing your friends or family members?
•Take your money or Social Security check, make you ask for money or refuse to give you money?
•Make all of the decisions?
•Tell you that you’re a bad parent or threaten to take away or hurt your children?
•Prevent you from working or attending school?
•Act like the abuse is no big deal, it’s your fault, or even deny doing it?
•Destroy your property or threaten to kill your pets?
•Intimidate you with guns, knives or other weapons?
•Shove you, slap you, choke you, or hit you?
•Force you to try and drop charges?
•Threaten to commit suicide?
•Threaten to kill you?

If you answered ‘yes’ to even one of these questions,
you may be in an abusive relationship.
For support and more information please call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) or at TTY 1-800-787-3224
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PostSubject: Re: ~Get Help Here~   Fri Sep 18, 2009 11:29 am

Are You Abusing?
Not all men are abusive, how do you measure up?

Abuse Is:
•Calling bad names or putting someone down
•Shouting and cursing
•Hitting, slapping and/or pushing
•Making threats of any kind
•Jealously and suspicion
•Keeping someone away from family and friends
•Throwing things around the house
Domestic violence is a crime.
It destroys relationships and families.

It passes from generation to generation.

It doesn’t have to be this way.

If you abuse, you can choose to stop.

Call us at 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) or 1-800-787-3223 (TTY).

Friends & Family
Yes, it is your business

Maybe he’s your friend, your brother-in-law, your cousin, co-worker, gym partner or fishing buddy. You’ve noticed that he interrupts her, criticizes her family, yells at her or scares her. You hope that when they’re alone, it isn’t worse.

The way he treats her makes you uncomfortable, but you don’t want to make him mad or lose his friendship. You surely don’t want to see him wreck his marriage or have to call the police. What can you do?

Say something. If you don’t, your silence is the same as saying abuse is ok. He could hurt someone, or end up in jail. Because you care, you need to do something… before it is too late.

What Can You Say or Do?
Draw attention to it.

“Do you see the effect your bad words have on her?”

“When you do that, it makes her feel bad.”

“Did you mean to be so rough? That’s not cool.”

Tell him what you think.
“I’m really worried about her safety.”

“I’m surprised to see you act that way. You’re better than that.”

“I care about you, but I won’t tolerate it if you abuse her.”

“This makes me really uncomfortable. It’s not right.”

Express ideas about loving behavior.
“Loving her doesn’t mean abusing her.”

“Good husbands and partners don’t say or do those kinds of things.”

Offer suggestions or solutions.
“Men should never hit or threaten the women they love.”

“Kids learn from their parents. Is this how you want your son to treat women?”

“How would you feel if your daughter chose someone who acted like this?”

“Call me if you feel like you’re losing control.”

“Maybe you should try counseling.”

“You should talk to your faith leader and see what he/she suggests.”

If his behavior is criminal, tell him so.
“Domestic violence is a crime. You could be arrested for this.”

“You could end up in jail if you don’t find a way to deal with your problems. Then what would happen to you and your family?”

He May Not Like It
He may not listen. He may get enraged, deny it, ignore you or make excuses. He may want to talk about what she did to him. He may even laugh it off or make fun of you. Still, you need to say something. Your silence is the same as saying you approve.

Or He May Take You Seriously and Decide to Change
If men learn to put down and abuse women from other men, they can also learn from other men how to respect women. When you decide that violence against women is unacceptable and choose to lead, other men will begin to think twice before they strike with their words or fists.

It isn’t easy or comfortable, but men must step up to the plate because next time, it could be your sister, mother, friend or co-worker. It’s the right thing to do.

Listen. Teach. Lead. Help Stop Domestic Violence


If you are concerned about the safety of your friend’s partner or spouse, or to learn about services in your area, contact the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) or

TTY 1-800-787-3224.

Do The Right Thing

Tell Him There Is A Better Way
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PostSubject: Re: ~Get Help Here~   Fri Sep 18, 2009 11:30 am

Technology Safety for Survivors
Technology Safety is a very important issue in the domestic violence community. Technological advances have great benefits but there are also drawbacks and caution must be used, especially when communicating online. People often don’t realize that the information they post online may reveal more about themselves than they intend. We sat down with an expert in the field to get insight and tips on safety. The following is our short question and answer session:

Where did you learn about online safety?The National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV) provides a great training program called Safety Net: the National Safe and Strategic Technology Project. Safety Net educates victims, their advocates and the general public on ways to use technology strategically to help find safety and escape domestic violence, sexual violence and stalking.



What advice do you have about internet browsing safety?

The most important thing to remember is to use a safe computer, one that the abuser has absolutely no access to. You can use a computer at the public library, at a friend’s place, a local internet cafe, etc. The reason for this is that everything you do on a computer can be tracked. Clearing the browsing history is not enough of a precaution because abusers can install spyware on your computer to track your usage even if they no longer have physical access to the computer.

What are some best practices for communicating safely online in regards to disclosure of personal information?It is always best to disclose as little as possible online. You never know who may be reading what you write. Do not write anything you would not want an abuser to know. Think before sharing any information about yourself or others that can identify you, including names, specific locations, or any other unique personal information. It is also important to understand that email is not a secure form of communication; it can be tracked. Sending emails should be treated in the same manner you would treat sending postcards, they can end up anywhere and anyone can read them.



What are some other general tips you would like to share?

The following are some general tips provided by NNEDV:

Trust your instincts: If you suspect an abusive person knows too much, it is possible that your phone, computer, email or other activities are being monitored.

Create a new email account: If you suspect that anyone abusive can access your email, consider creating an additional email account on a safer computer. Do not create or check this new email from a computer your abuser could access, in case it is monitored.

Change passwords and pin numbers: Some abusers use victim’s email and other accounts to impersonate and cause harm. If anyone abusive knows or may guess your passwords, change them quickly and frequently.

Use a donated or new cell phone: When making or receiving private calls or arranging escape plans, try not to use a shared or family cell phone because cell phone bill records and phone logs might reveal your plans to an abuser.
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